Sermon: Follow the Shepherd

Date – May 6, 2017

Text – John 10:1-10; Psalm 23

Title – Follow the Shepherd

In 2006, I joined a mission team from New England Conference and went to Nicaragua for a week. It was a time of spiritual renewal for me as I witnessed how the Christians gathered to proclaim Christ as their Lord, feed the children, and educate them. One day, we visited a small church on the top of a mountain that I cannot recall its name now. I was honestly surprised that people could live in that place because the top of mountain seemed to lack many resources – water, food, and electricity. I still remember the joy on the faces of about 30 children that received some gifts from the mission team.

Several boys took me out to outside the church and showed me a horse tied to a tree. I told them, “I have never ridden a horse before.” But they insisted. Well, I thought that I could ride the horse like I used to watch a western movie with cowboys. As I gave the sign, “Go!” guess what happened? The horse did not even move his foot. The children were giggling watching me struggling on the horse. When one young boy gave a command, the horse started moving slowly. Even the horse knew whom to listen.

In today’s reading, Jesus converses with his disciples with the Pharisees watching them, “I am the shepherd.” Of course, we are used to the image of Jesus as the shepherd who looks over the little lamb in his arms in the drawing. What we don’t think about is that if Jesus is the shepherd, we are the sheep. Our popular image of the sheep is that it is innocent, peaceful, and calm. But sheep is a vulnerable creature.

First, it is vulnerable to the predators. When I was a kid, I used to go and see my grandparents in the countryside. Outside the yard, they had a couple of goats with small horns. Although they were small, they would spot me and ready to attack me with their horns at any time. At least, the goats were able to defend themselves despite their size. But the sheep is different. They have no means to protect themselves. So they tend to herd together for protection. Or, they flee from the predators.

Second, the sheep is vulnerable to itself. In the Highlands of Scotland, a sheep would often wander off into the rocks and get into places that they couldn’t get out of. The grass on these mountains is very sweet and the sheep like it, and they will jump down ten or twelve feet, and then they can’t jump back again. They would also vulnerable to themselves as they would wander from the flock and left behind.

And I believe that is why Jesus uses the image of our relationship between himself and us as the shepherd and sheep. The sheep needs the shepherd not just for guidance but also survival. Without the protection and guidance, the sheep would not be able to survive one day. Moreover, Jesus says that he has come so that we may have the abundant life. The abundant life that overflows with joy and happiness. The abundant life that gives a purpose of our life in this world, and relationship that enriches us.

Of course, some of us might think, “That is not true. I am in control of what happens in my life. I am not a sheep. Rather, I am strong enough to defend myself and guide myself.” I am successful enough with my career. I am not like those who constantly worry where the money comes from tomorrow. I am healthy enough. I am not like those who struggle with addictions. I am well surrounded by my family and friends. I am not like those who feel lonely and vulnerable. We can go on saying, “I have a good self-esteem. I have my principle. I have my education. They are what guide my life. I am a pretty independent person.

But from time to time, we come to a point in our life that what we considered as the foundation of our life comes to an end. When we realize that it is gone, we feel stripped and vulnerable. We feel depressed and feel lost. I can share with you that I went through such times in my life. There was a time when I felt like I was a young handsome man with good education and promising future. But there came a time that destroyed my self-esteem, my health, and relationship. My witness is that those cannot be the shepherd that guide my life.

While the sheep is a vulnerable creature, Jesus calls us sheep because it recognizes the voice of its master. It intuitively knows the voice of the shepherd who was there when the sheep was born, fed it, and guides to the green pastures. A group of tourists visited a farm with sheep on the hill in Norway. The shepherd invited the tourists to call the sheep and see if they would respond. They said the same words that the shepherd said. Occasionally, one or two sheep would raise their head but they do not move at all. But when the shepherd calls, they not only raise their head but also run to the shepherd. They feel comfort and love from their master.

This past month has been rough for me and my family as some of you know. The week before the Holy Week, my mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. I honestly felt like walking through the valley of death. My younger brother and sister-in-law in Toronto decide to go back to Korea to help my mother for the surgery and recovery. I felt very vulnerable. For days, I did not even want to call my family in Korea because I was afraid of the next news I would hear. There is a Korean saying, “A monk cannot shave his own head.” I am the pastor at the church providing spiritual care for the people. But I felt really vulnerable at the moment.

But then I realized that while my mother was expecting the surgery, God was also calling me to deeper relationship with God. God wanted me to raise my head and flee to God as God called my name. You read the Bible. And you realize that God who laid the foundation of the world in the beginning knows us better than anyone in this world. And we call our God the Good Shepherd because this God strangely sacrifices His own life for the sake of the sheep. Jesus warns of those who steal, kill, and destroy their flock. Although they might act like the shepherd, Jesus calls them the thief.

Jesus, instead, lays his life for his flock. He gives his life so that we can have new life in him. According to the story from the Highlands of Scotland, when they sheep wander off and stuck in the cliff, the shepherd will wait until they are so faint and they cannot stand. And they put a rope around him and he will go over and pull that sheep up out of the trouble. Some might ask, “Why don’t they go down there when the sheep first gets there?” The answer is that “They would dash right over the precipice and be killed if they did.”

When we feel the most vulnerable, we wonder why our good shepherd is not responding. We complain that there is no God in the midst of trouble and suffering. But I believe that Christ our Shepherd is watching over us right there. It is often when we let go of our ego, our own ways, our own wisdom, then we realize that the Holy Spirit gives us the wisdom where God is leading us as our shepherd.

My mother’s surgery went well. The doctors are taking good care of her for her recovery process. In our phone conversation, my mother said, “You know son, our church lost a person last year to pancreatic cancer. He was only 58 years old. I cannot imagine what he and his family went through. And I feel that God is calling me to be more loving and compassionate toward the cancer patients in the future.” I realized that in the midst of her struggle, she was walking with her shepherd who was calling her into deeper relationship with God.

And I also invite you to recognize the voice of your shepherd. I invite you to realize how much you all mean to your shepherd. If God, the Creator of the universe, is willing to die for us, I believe that there is nothing in this world that can deny how much God loves us. I hope that you give your hand to your shepherd promising to walk humbly and walk in the light and righteousness of God. I hope that you go deeper in your relationship with God always discerning the guidance and voice of your shepherd.


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