Sermon: A Redemptive Dream of God

Date: September 10, 2017

Text: Genesis 37:1-11

Title: A Redemptive Dream of God: Joseph’s Story #1

 

During this summer, we went over the story of Jacob. It was a story of how God reshaped his identity from a trickster to a person of blessing. He fooled his brother in his eagerness for the birth right. He even fooled his father, Isaac, who was weak and blind. However, God called him out to the wilderness and made him go through a time of changing his identity. His original name, Jacob, meant the grabber. But God blessed him at the river after the night of wrestling and called him Israel. This month, I invite you to walk with me with the narrative of Jacob’s son, Joseph, a dreamer, through whom God delivered his entire family from the famine and brought to reconciliation.

Interestingly, Joseph’s story begins with another dysfunctional family. His father, Jacob, experienced the parental favoritism. Jacob was favored by his mother, Rebecca. His brother was favored by his father, Isaac. Although many of us believe that we equally love our children, many psychologists suggest that it is natural to admit that we favor a certain child over others due to the gender, personality, or certain need. Well, parental favoritism, however, often leads to the conflict and brokenness within the family. And the book of Genesis tells us that Joseph was the favorite of his father among his 12 children because he was born while Jacob was old.

Just imagine that parents decide to divide their inheritance for their children. They give their 15 years old pick-up truck to you. But they decide to buy a new sedan for your brother or sister. And they tell you, “We equally love you both.” Would you believe what they say? Or would you be jealous of your sibling and complain the unfair treatment from your parents? This is what Jacob does. Because he loved Joseph among other sons, he made an ornate robe with long sleeves. Joseph wore his robe to show his brothers that he was the favorite son of his father over his brothers. The scripture tells us that they hated him and could not speak a kind word to him.

Although the popular image of Joseph from our Sunday school and movie might describe him as a faithful man with God’s dream, we find his character, not just immature but also arrogant. The scripture says that he was a young man of seventeen. It is a wonderful age. My former parishioner who recently deceased used to tell me how he met his lovely wife from the high school when he was only 17 years old at the prom party. Some are filled with excitement for going to the college. Some are filled hope for working and starting their careers. Many 17 years old are eager to leave their parents and gain their independence from them.

I am sure that Joseph was a young man with many excitements for his future. But see after he tended the flocks with his brothers, he came home and went to his father to bring a bad report about them. “Dad, Reuben forgot to give the water to your sheep. You know, Judah only sleeps during the day while I work hard for you.” Well, his father Jacob does not correct him but allows him to be spoiled. And how more trouble comes to him because of his dreams. He had a dream that he and his brothers were binding sheaves of grain in the field. Then his sheaf rose, and the sheaves of his brothers gathered around and bowed down to it. He not only dreams but also knows what it means. But he immaturely goes to his brothers and tells them about it. And the scripture tells us that they hated him all the more.

Here is more trouble. Joseph had another dream. This time, the sun and moon and eleven stars bowed down to him. He knew that his brothers were pretty upset when he first told them about his first dream. But it seems that he is eager to upset them even more. He again goes to his brothers and tells them the dream that his entire family including his mother and father would bow down to him. Joseph lacks humility. He is so caught up in his achievement, dream, and success. It is all about him. He does not care about how others might feel about him.

How about you? What were you like when you were 17 years old? Were you filled with many visions and dreams for your future? What did you want to become as you were growing up? What kind of family did you want to make or what kind of spouse did you think you were going to meet? What was your character like? Were you a person of humility caring about others around you? I wonder how many of us can relate to Joseph that when we were 17 years old, our life revolved around us. It was about my career. It was about my house. It was about my family. It was about my success…

I admit that I can relate to Joseph when I was 17 years old. When I was in the high school, my neighborhood was notorious for its poor education. Going to a college is a choice one can make. But the chance was very limited in our town. But with the grace of God, I was able to make it to a good school through which I met my wife, Sungha. But when I was at the school, I was not grateful. I thought that I was there because I was a smart kid. I was full of complaints. I was critical of Christianity, condemned the church for its corruption and exclusivity, and everything.

For Joseph, his arrogance and insensitivity bring him to the unwanted pitfall of his life. His father, Jacob, asked him to go and check on them grazing the flocks near Shechem which was about 60 miles away from him. When he arrived at Shechem, his brothers took it as an opportunity to plot against him and even kill him. They say, “Let’s kill him and throw him into one of these cisterns and say that a ferocious animal devoured him.” Just imagine how hateful his brothers were against Joseph because of his broken relationship with them over the years fueled by the favoritism of their father.

But Reuben, the first son of twelve, tries to alter the plan and save his life. “Don’t shed any blood. Let’s just throw him into this cistern in the wilderness” They were eating their meat while their brother Joseph was starving in the pit. Then they saw a caravan of Ishmaelites going on their way to Egypt. Another brother Judah says, “What will we gain if we kill our brother and cover up his blood? Come, let’s sell him to the Ishmaelites instead.” Joseph’s brothers sold him into slavery and tried to cover up the story by killing a goat and dipping the robe that their father made for him in the blood. They brought the bad report to their father, “We found this.” Jacob tore his clothes, put on sackcloth and mourned for him saying, “I will continue to mourn until I join my son in the grave.”

Joseph, a young man, spoiled by his father’s favoritism, a young man who was arrogant and self-centered, is now forced to live as a slave. He is taken out of his comfort and privilege and forced to unknown future. In “What’s your Story?” Sarah Heath insightfully suggests that God calls Joseph out to adventure through what seems like a pitfall in his life. Just like his father, Jacob was reshaped in his character through the trials under his uncle, God calls Joseph to go to unknown territory believing that God will surely walk with him and reshape his identity and alter his life. We will learn more about the redemptive plan of God through the turmoil of Joseph. But the message seems clear to me. When we think that it is all about me, God calls us tells us that it is not about us. It is actually about God. It is also about others God calls us to serve.

I was retired from the military in 2001. I was still disillusioned with my life being arrogant and self-centered. But I was not happy that although I was studying at the seminary, I did not have a call to ministry but only grumbling about the church. I was 20 years old and came to visit my uncle and aunt in Baltimore for two months. On Sundays, we always went to a Korean immigrant church. One Sunday, I decided to visit a United Methodist Church on the same block as the Korean church. The pastor was very graceful. The congregation was very diverse with white, black, and Hispanic/Latinos. I was very touched by the pastor who was full of energy and joy walking back and forth engaging the congregation. After the worship, he asked me what I was doing in Korea. When I told him that I studied theology, he said, “Oh, you should go to Boston University. I went to the school as well.”

I did not know at that time that God was speaking through the minister that God was calling me to follow God to unknown adventure. It was a journey that called me to come out of my family, friends, and comfort zone in Korea. But I am glad that I was able to follow God by God’s grace at that time. It is because I came to realize that it was not about me. Although I was an arrogant and self-centered person, God made me see an alternative reality through the congregation in Baltimore. Maybe some of us today feel like that we are trapped in the pit just like Joseph was. You are not happy about your situation because you believe that you were forced to be there. But I hope that we see the hands of God calling us to follow to unknown adventure through which God will bless not just us but also those around us.

As theologian Donald Miller says, the story we live today is a redemptive story of God. It is about how God saves us from our sins and calls us to live as God’s children in our faithful response to God’s grace. It is not about us. But it is about God. And it is about the people and God’s creation that God is calling us to go and serve in God’s love. I hope that we answer the call and follow God even though we cannot predict our future, we cannot calculate the benefit. But God has a wonderful plan for us. God has a story of redemption, restoration, and reconciliation at the end of the story for us. Let us boldly take out steps to the adventure together. Amen.

Sermon: Overcome Evil with Good

Date: September 3, 2017

Text – Romans 12:9-21

 

Around 6 am this past Tuesday, it was said that North Korea launched a ballistic missile eastward over Japan and into the Pacific Ocean. According to Japanese officials, the missile broke into three pieces and landed some 730 miles off the coast of Hokkaido. If you know the history, this was not the first missile test by North Korea that fired over Japan. It happened in 1998 and 2009 as well. When things like this happen, my friends and parishioners ask me, “You must be worried about your families and friends in South Korea.” Well, the fact of matter is that South Korea has always lived in conflict with North Korea since the war in 1950. People know how to find peace in the middle of tension. But what is alarming is that North Korea claims that it has developed not just IRBM but also ICBM which stands for Inter-Continental Ballistic Missile. It means that no one is safe around the world.

Although the missile test by North Korea is not new, this one was more provocative because it took place while Kim Jung-Un threatened to bomb Guam as the next target. North Korea is defined as one of the evils in the world. They are the enemies of the world peace. They must be destroyed. When we deal with any possible threat to our life, civilians, and country, we define the other party as the enemy to be destroyed. That is exactly what happened with the Iraq War in 2003 that overturned the government of Saddam Hussein. That is what happened with killing Osama Bin Laden in 2011. That is what is still happening with the war against ISIS. We are at the war with our enemies because they pose threat to our lives and even claim that they were behind the terrorism 9/11, Boston, and Paris. But the problem is that the war is not ending. Even after we take out the terrorists, they are still grown not just abroad but also home right here.

While we are struggling with the terrorism, war, and missiles, we hear the words of Paul who exhorts the Christians in Rome, “Do not overcome evil by evil, but overcome evil with good.” He even says, “Bless those who persecute you; but do not curse them.” I acknowledge that I also have a hard time accepting Paul’s words. Most of us might dismiss his exhortation as archaic as it can be. Above all, it sounds very counter-cultural today. You commit crime. You have to pay for it. I read so many people arrested for possessing illegal drugs in their vehicles from our local news all the time. You cause harm to others. You have to compensate for what you do to them. That is the logic of our society. That is how the law organizes our society. But Paul’s words reflect on another kingdom, not this world, but of God that values forgiveness and reconciliation.

Paul gives us two reasons why we need to overcome evil with good. One is theological that we are created in the image of God who ultimately forgives and loves. He says, “Beloved, never avenge yourselves, but leave room for the wrath of God; for it is written, ‘Vengeance is mine, I will repay, says the Lord.” In other words, when we judge our neighbors as our enemies and take avenge by using our power and rights, we are taking the role of God who is our ultimate judge on the final day. Of course, this does not mean that we have to negate the necessity of our government, law, and justice system. They have their roles with the civic duty to uphold what we agree as law of our society. However, as St. Augustine said in the City of God, we need to recognize that our ultimate citizenship belongs to the kingdom of God.

Paul also gives us practical reason of why we need to overcome evil with good. He says, “If your enemies are hungry, feed them; if they are thirsty, give them something to drink; for by doing this you will heap burning coals on their heads.” When someone treats us ill, the expectation is that we do the same to the person. Say the harsh words just like the person did. Strike the cheek as we are hit on our cheek. But when we repay the evil with our kindness, mercy, and friendship, we create in their hearts agony and frustration. Gandhi called non-violence as truth force. When one does not repay evil with evil, the purpose is to convert our opponent as our friend. While people see non-violent as passive tactic or sign of weakness, Gandhi saw it as the weapon of the strong that points to the truth.

When I was about 10 years old, I was sometimes bullied by this kid. He was stronger and bigger than me. So, I came up with a solution: I asked my parents to send me to Tae Kwon Do school to study the self-defense. I learned how to kick and throw punch. But the sad news was that he could still beat me because he was much stronger than me. Well, we ended up becoming friends eventually. How? I invited him to play the baseball with me at the church on Sunday morning while the adults were worshiping in the church. We often hit the ball and threw the ball in the wrong direction. Unfortunately, we broke several windows at the church and adults came out of the church looking for the suspect. The best way to eliminate your enemy is to make the person your friend. That was my lesson from my friendship with him.

As the U.S. is struggling with North Korea today, I am sure that some of us are anxious, some of us are upset, and some of us are confused. While we are still discerning what our responses should be as individual and national, Paul’s instruction might be the key to solve the conflict today. In February 2008, the New York Philharmonic went to Pyung-Yang, the capital of North Korea and performed a concert playing the national anthems of both North Korea and the United States. It is said that the event was the first significant cultural visit from the U.S. to North Korea since the Korean War. The highlight of the concert was that the orchestra ended with playing the popular Korean folk song “Arirang.” It is a song that someone is broken-hearted because his/her love is leaving her. So, one sings that his/her love shall not walk even two miles before his/her foot hurt.

I would like to invite you to watch the video with me. And see how music brings two countries, cultures, and ideologies together. Look at how the audience from North Korea is touched by the music.

As we pray for peace in this nation and world, Paul’s exhoartation sounds true as I watch this video over and over again. We do not overcome evil with evil. Rather, we overcome evil with empathy, compassion, and friendship. As Martin Luther King Jr. said, only light can drive away darkness. Let us over come evil with good by the grace of God. Amen.

 

Putnam Peace Day: September 24, 2 pm

THERE IS NO PEACE WHEN THERE IS PREJUDICE

PUTNAM

PEACE DAY CELEBRATION

SUN. SEPT. 24TH 2PM

Prayers, Music, Words

Join the Greater Putnam Interfaith Council as we pray,
enjoy company, sing songs and say words to celebrate United Nations Peace Day at the Daughters of The Holy Spirit. Please bring a prayer, poem, or written words about Peace.

WHERE: DAUGHTERS OF THE HOLY SPIRIT Auditorium, Provincial House 72 Church Street, Putnam, CT

Food or Monetary Donations to Daily Bread Accepted.

Sponsored by GPIC