Sermon: Praise the Lord

Date: September 23, 2018

 

Text: Psalm 148

Title: Praise the Lord!

 

When I was 8 years old, my father moved to the countryside of Korea where he took a new church as a pastor. It was a small village where most people worked as farmers. After school, most of my friends went to the fields to help their parents with fertilizing the soil, sowing the seeds, or harvesting in the fall. Although we did not own a farm, my mother made a small garden next the parsonage where she planted flowers, vegetables, and fruits. She would spend hours working in her garden. One day, my mother, while working in her garden, turned to me and said, “Look at these flowers. Look how beautiful they are. As they wave in the wind, don’t you think that they are singing and praising God, their Creator?” As she was humming the melody of a hymn, it still lingers in my ears like yesterday.

The Psalmist also sings and praise the Lord. He says that everyone needs to praise the name of the Lord. It is not just human beings that praise God. Praise him, all his angels; praise him, all his heavenly hosts. Praise him, sun and moon; praise him, all you shining stars. Praise him, you highest heavens and you waters above the skies. Praise the Lord from the earth, you great sea creatures. You mountains and all hills, fruit trees and all cedars, wild animals and all cattle, small creatures and flying birds. The Psalmist says that everything created in the world should praise God because at God’s command, they are all created. It is God who has established them forever and also issued a decree that will never pass away, which is the natural law that governs the movement of the universe.

Have you visited a place and witnessed the grace of God in the beauty of God’s creation? In August 2003, I was studying English in Sydney, Australia. Toward the end of my stay there, I decided to travel from Sydney to Melbourne with my friend from college. If you drive the car straight to Melbourne, it takes about 8 hours. But we traveled by the shore enjoying the ocean road, which took us about 15 hours in car. Our second evening, we stopped the Phillips Island where we could see penguins come out of the oceans. There were about 50 people sitting on the beach, not being able to take pictures because the flashlight could make them go blind. I was surrounded by the sound of waves, sea gulls, and wind. We sat and waited for about one hour. And there, in the middle of dark evening, we saw hundreds of penguins come out of the ocean and make a little parade right next to us, heading toward their nests.

When I saw the miraculous actions of these penguins, I could do nothing but praise God who designed God’s creature with instinct and beauty. I am sure that many of you have witnessed something like that in your lives. Maybe when you visited Niagara Falls for the first time and heard the might sound of the water fall, you praised God in awe. Maybe when you visited the Grand Canyon and saw the eagles flying high, you gave thanks to God for allowing you visit there while you still breathed. Maybe you did not have to travel that far to witness the wonderful hands of God. Just like my mother, you sowed the seeds of flowers at your garden. When the spring came, you saw the little plants come out with life and blossom into beautiful flowers. Winter was there. But spring surely comes. And you praised God for the faithfulness of God at your little garden.

The Celtic Christians also had wisdom in joining the creation of God for praise. In the Celtic Spirituality, there is a sense of unity with all creation, both human and nonhuman, that transcends time and space. Its unity brings the whole world together as participants in the singing of one great hymn of praise. In the Celtic tradition, there is a story about a mother who tells her children that each day must start with the human voice joining in the song of the birds, since in the whole created order, all the creatures of earth, ocean, and sky were giving glory to God, it was foolish for the human beings not to join them. So from Ireland, Scotland, Wales, from the literate and the illiterate, from the earliest to the present day, we have the same message: Join in the worship of the whole universe. Alexander Carmichael says in Carmina Gadelica, “it is dumb of us not to join the creation of God in their giving glory to God.” (Esther De Waal, The Celtic Way of Prayer)

I know that we often have a difficult time to praise God. From time to time, in our spiritual journey, we encounter trials and tribulations along the way. We often suffer loss, grief, loneliness, illness. We feel not appreciated and loved as we are. How can we still celebrate and praise God? As I drove around the town this week, I start to notice some red on the trees. It means that they are changing their color from green and red. No one told them to change their color. But they obey the words from their Creator. And they praise God even though they might lose all their leaves soon and even wither during the cold winter. But they still praise God because the spring is surely coming after the long night and cold weather. In the same way, the Celtic Christians also lived with a rhythm keeping the relationship between the light and the dark, both winter and spring. The Celtic year begins with the feast of Samhaine on November 1, when darkness overtakes the light. By entering the season of winter, the Celtic Christians considered their life as the gift of God, not something to control.

When we realize that the main purpose of God’s creation is to praise God, and that all God’s creation is already praising God whether we join them or not, the boundary between what is sacred and what is secular collapses. This whole world reflects the wonderful hands of God who has created everything with power, grace, and love. When we talk in the woods thinking that we are having some alone time for ourselves, we are actually surrounded by the nature that is already praising God in their very beings. Our walk turns to a time of celebrating and rejoicing along with God’s creation. As Beth Richardson beautifully writes in Christ Beside Me, Christ Within Me, we see the bird nest looking fragile and sitting on the electrical box. As we see the protection of the eggs by the mother bird, we rejoice with them in our praise of God who also protects God’s people and creation, giving us what we need for today and tomorrow.

Because life is seen as the gift of God, we are enabled to fill our hearts with praise and thanksgiving. As we give thanks to God for the material world and nurture the gratitude and reverence, we become a more faithful stewards entrusted to preserve the earth rather than exploit and destroy it. As we glimpse the presence of God surrounding all God’s creation and the universe, we also give thanks to God for the mundane activities of daily work. When we appreciate the goodness through God’s creation, our response is not complaints or grumbling. But it is gratitude and thankfulness. Even when we sleep at night and rest, God still grows the crops on the field with morning dews, wind, sunlight, and rain. We often think that it is us who needs to do all the works. But even when we fail to do our works, God is still faithful in providing us, helping us, and saving us.

Amen.

 

MLK Breakfast on January 15

 

MLK_flyer2018

Time: January 15 (Monday) 2018. 8:00 AM

Keynote Speaker: Rev. Mike Clark, “The Life and Legacy of MLK”

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Special Music from TMHS Modern Music Ensemble

Breakfast Price: $8 per adult. $4 per child.

 

We are grateful local business/organizations that have donated toward this event generously.

American Legion, Post 13
Cargill Council No. 64
Gerardi Insurance
Greater Putnam Interfaith Council
King GMC
Knights of Columbus
Putnam Bank

Sermon: Home Is Where We Meet

Date: December 10, 2017

 

Text – Psalm 85: 1-2, 8-13

Title – Home Is Where We Meet

 

When we say the word “home,” it seems to bring many emotions. Comfortable. Relaxing. Embracing. Peaceful…etc. Advent and Christmas is the season that people think about the meaning of home more. People drive or fly to be with their families. One of the images is that the families sit around the fireplace next to the Christmas tree. Children are excited to tear open the gift boxes on Christmas Day. Grandparents tell the stories holding their grandchildren. Ham is cooking inside the oven for the dinner. Children from college come home for the vacation. Soldiers come home to be with their family. When we say the word “home,” I wonder if you have any specific place in your mind.

For me, it is hard to pinpoint and say that this is my home. In growing up as a Methodist pastor’s kid, my childhood was always on the move. I remember living in 3 different towns until I turned 8 years old. After finally spending 12 years at one small church in the countryside, my life started rolling again from place to place. I went to the college. I joined the military. I wanted to explore the world and learn English so I went to the Philippines and Australia. I finished the college. I came to Boston to study theology. Then, my life now is that when the bishop says, “It is time to move,” my family pack everything and move. So, it is hard to pinpoint and say, “This is my home.”

Recently, I had an incident that made me feel like I was far from home. When I was waiting to pick up Daniel at the school, some children were exiting their classroom for recess. As they were passing by me, one of the boys, looking like 7 or 8 years old, started laughing at me and saying, “Chinese!” Well, it is not the first time people look at me and say, “Ni Hao?” What am I supposed to say? “Not all Asians are Chinese?” It is a little boy so I cannot judge what implication he had exactly in his mind. But in the hallway, this boy was laughing at me for being different. I looked at him directly with a stern face, implying “stop.” But he kept going on. And I started thinking what Daniel is going through at the school now.

Well, my case is different from most of you in this church. But I wonder if some of you also share similar experience as mine. I wonder some of you feel like you miss home. I know that some of you are not from here originally as well. Some of you are from the mid-west. Some of you are from the south. I know that you all have your family around here. But you always feel like that there is another home in your heart. It is not that you can go back there now because the place you grew up is not recognizable now. Probably new restaurants. New neighbors. New buildings. But in your dream, you often find yourself being back to the place with your father and mother and your siblings. The sense of missing home in your heart.

In today’s text, the writer of Psalm sings such memory of being home. “Lord, you were favorable to your land. You restored the fortunes of Jacob. You forgave the iniquity of your people. You pardoned all their sin.” In other words, the Psalmist is saying, “O God, you used to be so much nicer.” Why does the singer say that God used to nicer? Many biblical scholars agree that this song was written either while the Israelites were in exile in Babylon or they just returned to their homeland they found ruined. In other words, they miss their home where they had and enjoyed the abundance in God. But they are all gone now. They are far away from their home and miss it badly in their hearts. So, the song praises God who was very gracious in the past.

In the Disciple Bible Study, we have been recently studying how Moses was instructed by God to build the tabernacle as the place of worship for God. What is interesting is that God ordered Moses to put the ring on each corner of the arc of the covenant. But it was not just the arc of the covenant. God ordered to put the ring on the tabernacle as well so that when the time came to move, the priests could carry the tabernacle and the arc of God with the poles. God guided the Israelites through the wilderness by the cloud and fire. When the cloud came down and stayed around the tabernacle, it meant that God was there. When the clouds moved, it was the time for them to pack everything and follow and move.

It was interesting to me that the Israelites did not find the sense of home through the houses, their hometowns, or buildings. In their journey through the wilderness, they constantly moved from place to place. So, there is no point arguing which place they could pinpoint and say that this is our home. Rather, they found their security, their comfort, and their hope in God who was constantly on move. Wherever the arc went, it symbolized the presence of God who was with them. Wherever God was, the Israelites found home. When the Israelites were about to lose their battle against Babylon, Jeremiah told them that it is ok. God would go with them to the foreign land and surely be with them there.

And I was reminded of the special Christmas Eve I spent when I was in New Hampshire. While people were growing excited to spend Christmas with their families and friends, I realized that I and Sungha were not the only ones that did not have families here. In my church, there was a young man with a mental illness who lived alone with his cat. He yearend to come to the church every Sunday because the church was the only place that was nice to him. Since he did not have a car, he walked 1 hour and 30 min to the church every Sunday. There was also a family of single mother and her 3 years old son that lived in the housing project that was considered as dangerous. After the Christmas Eve service, we gathered for a special celebration with burgers and soda from McDonald.

As we shared the spirit of fellowship and hospitality, I felt in my heart that I was home. It is not the physical building that brought the sense of home. The house was rather unorganized, messy in the dangerous neighborhood. But the sense of being together, embracing one another as friend, and seeing the face of Christ was what brought a sense of home to me. The church is Greek is ecclesia. It means “being called out of the world.” It is interesting to notice that we do not choose to come out of the world and decide to become Christians. It is the work of the Holy Spirit who calls us, even though we might not share much in common, even come from many different places, and make one body in Christ together. As Christ welcomed strangers, forgave sinners, and healed the sick, we know that Christ is in the middle of us when we gather in his name and serve one another in humility. Home is right here with us.

Advent is the season that we hear the story how God came to this world and found home by dwelling among us. Christ did not come as the prince of the powerful or the rich. Rather, he came as a meek and humble baby of a carpenter and his teen mother surrounded by animals and shepherds. And the message Christ brings to us is “Emmanuel” – God is with us. God is right here with us even we struggle with despair, hopelessness, and anxiety. God is right here with us and we find home in the presence of God. We find the presence of God when we are called by the grace of God to make new family by welcoming and embracing one another as new brother and sister in Christ. And I want us to watch a video this morning which is shared in this season of Advent.

Somehow, I think this story illustrates what Christmas is about. When we were far from God because of our sins and brokenness, God still came to us in Christ and adopt us as God’s children again. God comes to us and dwells among us calling our place, however messy it might be, home. And whenever we gather in God’s name, sharing the spirit of radical hospitality, love, and peace, it is our home. May God bless us all as we faithfully wait for the coming of Christ whose message is this, “God is with us.” Amen.

Sermon: A Redemptive Dream of God

Date: September 10, 2017

Text: Genesis 37:1-11

Title: A Redemptive Dream of God: Joseph’s Story #1

 

During this summer, we went over the story of Jacob. It was a story of how God reshaped his identity from a trickster to a person of blessing. He fooled his brother in his eagerness for the birth right. He even fooled his father, Isaac, who was weak and blind. However, God called him out to the wilderness and made him go through a time of changing his identity. His original name, Jacob, meant the grabber. But God blessed him at the river after the night of wrestling and called him Israel. This month, I invite you to walk with me with the narrative of Jacob’s son, Joseph, a dreamer, through whom God delivered his entire family from the famine and brought to reconciliation.

Interestingly, Joseph’s story begins with another dysfunctional family. His father, Jacob, experienced the parental favoritism. Jacob was favored by his mother, Rebecca. His brother was favored by his father, Isaac. Although many of us believe that we equally love our children, many psychologists suggest that it is natural to admit that we favor a certain child over others due to the gender, personality, or certain need. Well, parental favoritism, however, often leads to the conflict and brokenness within the family. And the book of Genesis tells us that Joseph was the favorite of his father among his 12 children because he was born while Jacob was old.

Just imagine that parents decide to divide their inheritance for their children. They give their 15 years old pick-up truck to you. But they decide to buy a new sedan for your brother or sister. And they tell you, “We equally love you both.” Would you believe what they say? Or would you be jealous of your sibling and complain the unfair treatment from your parents? This is what Jacob does. Because he loved Joseph among other sons, he made an ornate robe with long sleeves. Joseph wore his robe to show his brothers that he was the favorite son of his father over his brothers. The scripture tells us that they hated him and could not speak a kind word to him.

Although the popular image of Joseph from our Sunday school and movie might describe him as a faithful man with God’s dream, we find his character, not just immature but also arrogant. The scripture says that he was a young man of seventeen. It is a wonderful age. My former parishioner who recently deceased used to tell me how he met his lovely wife from the high school when he was only 17 years old at the prom party. Some are filled with excitement for going to the college. Some are filled hope for working and starting their careers. Many 17 years old are eager to leave their parents and gain their independence from them.

I am sure that Joseph was a young man with many excitements for his future. But see after he tended the flocks with his brothers, he came home and went to his father to bring a bad report about them. “Dad, Reuben forgot to give the water to your sheep. You know, Judah only sleeps during the day while I work hard for you.” Well, his father Jacob does not correct him but allows him to be spoiled. And how more trouble comes to him because of his dreams. He had a dream that he and his brothers were binding sheaves of grain in the field. Then his sheaf rose, and the sheaves of his brothers gathered around and bowed down to it. He not only dreams but also knows what it means. But he immaturely goes to his brothers and tells them about it. And the scripture tells us that they hated him all the more.

Here is more trouble. Joseph had another dream. This time, the sun and moon and eleven stars bowed down to him. He knew that his brothers were pretty upset when he first told them about his first dream. But it seems that he is eager to upset them even more. He again goes to his brothers and tells them the dream that his entire family including his mother and father would bow down to him. Joseph lacks humility. He is so caught up in his achievement, dream, and success. It is all about him. He does not care about how others might feel about him.

How about you? What were you like when you were 17 years old? Were you filled with many visions and dreams for your future? What did you want to become as you were growing up? What kind of family did you want to make or what kind of spouse did you think you were going to meet? What was your character like? Were you a person of humility caring about others around you? I wonder how many of us can relate to Joseph that when we were 17 years old, our life revolved around us. It was about my career. It was about my house. It was about my family. It was about my success…

I admit that I can relate to Joseph when I was 17 years old. When I was in the high school, my neighborhood was notorious for its poor education. Going to a college is a choice one can make. But the chance was very limited in our town. But with the grace of God, I was able to make it to a good school through which I met my wife, Sungha. But when I was at the school, I was not grateful. I thought that I was there because I was a smart kid. I was full of complaints. I was critical of Christianity, condemned the church for its corruption and exclusivity, and everything.

For Joseph, his arrogance and insensitivity bring him to the unwanted pitfall of his life. His father, Jacob, asked him to go and check on them grazing the flocks near Shechem which was about 60 miles away from him. When he arrived at Shechem, his brothers took it as an opportunity to plot against him and even kill him. They say, “Let’s kill him and throw him into one of these cisterns and say that a ferocious animal devoured him.” Just imagine how hateful his brothers were against Joseph because of his broken relationship with them over the years fueled by the favoritism of their father.

But Reuben, the first son of twelve, tries to alter the plan and save his life. “Don’t shed any blood. Let’s just throw him into this cistern in the wilderness” They were eating their meat while their brother Joseph was starving in the pit. Then they saw a caravan of Ishmaelites going on their way to Egypt. Another brother Judah says, “What will we gain if we kill our brother and cover up his blood? Come, let’s sell him to the Ishmaelites instead.” Joseph’s brothers sold him into slavery and tried to cover up the story by killing a goat and dipping the robe that their father made for him in the blood. They brought the bad report to their father, “We found this.” Jacob tore his clothes, put on sackcloth and mourned for him saying, “I will continue to mourn until I join my son in the grave.”

Joseph, a young man, spoiled by his father’s favoritism, a young man who was arrogant and self-centered, is now forced to live as a slave. He is taken out of his comfort and privilege and forced to unknown future. In “What’s your Story?” Sarah Heath insightfully suggests that God calls Joseph out to adventure through what seems like a pitfall in his life. Just like his father, Jacob was reshaped in his character through the trials under his uncle, God calls Joseph to go to unknown territory believing that God will surely walk with him and reshape his identity and alter his life. We will learn more about the redemptive plan of God through the turmoil of Joseph. But the message seems clear to me. When we think that it is all about me, God calls us tells us that it is not about us. It is actually about God. It is also about others God calls us to serve.

I was retired from the military in 2001. I was still disillusioned with my life being arrogant and self-centered. But I was not happy that although I was studying at the seminary, I did not have a call to ministry but only grumbling about the church. I was 20 years old and came to visit my uncle and aunt in Baltimore for two months. On Sundays, we always went to a Korean immigrant church. One Sunday, I decided to visit a United Methodist Church on the same block as the Korean church. The pastor was very graceful. The congregation was very diverse with white, black, and Hispanic/Latinos. I was very touched by the pastor who was full of energy and joy walking back and forth engaging the congregation. After the worship, he asked me what I was doing in Korea. When I told him that I studied theology, he said, “Oh, you should go to Boston University. I went to the school as well.”

I did not know at that time that God was speaking through the minister that God was calling me to follow God to unknown adventure. It was a journey that called me to come out of my family, friends, and comfort zone in Korea. But I am glad that I was able to follow God by God’s grace at that time. It is because I came to realize that it was not about me. Although I was an arrogant and self-centered person, God made me see an alternative reality through the congregation in Baltimore. Maybe some of us today feel like that we are trapped in the pit just like Joseph was. You are not happy about your situation because you believe that you were forced to be there. But I hope that we see the hands of God calling us to follow to unknown adventure through which God will bless not just us but also those around us.

As theologian Donald Miller says, the story we live today is a redemptive story of God. It is about how God saves us from our sins and calls us to live as God’s children in our faithful response to God’s grace. It is not about us. But it is about God. And it is about the people and God’s creation that God is calling us to go and serve in God’s love. I hope that we answer the call and follow God even though we cannot predict our future, we cannot calculate the benefit. But God has a wonderful plan for us. God has a story of redemption, restoration, and reconciliation at the end of the story for us. Let us boldly take out steps to the adventure together. Amen.

Sermon: Overcome Evil with Good

Date: September 3, 2017

Text – Romans 12:9-21

 

Around 6 am this past Tuesday, it was said that North Korea launched a ballistic missile eastward over Japan and into the Pacific Ocean. According to Japanese officials, the missile broke into three pieces and landed some 730 miles off the coast of Hokkaido. If you know the history, this was not the first missile test by North Korea that fired over Japan. It happened in 1998 and 2009 as well. When things like this happen, my friends and parishioners ask me, “You must be worried about your families and friends in South Korea.” Well, the fact of matter is that South Korea has always lived in conflict with North Korea since the war in 1950. People know how to find peace in the middle of tension. But what is alarming is that North Korea claims that it has developed not just IRBM but also ICBM which stands for Inter-Continental Ballistic Missile. It means that no one is safe around the world.

Although the missile test by North Korea is not new, this one was more provocative because it took place while Kim Jung-Un threatened to bomb Guam as the next target. North Korea is defined as one of the evils in the world. They are the enemies of the world peace. They must be destroyed. When we deal with any possible threat to our life, civilians, and country, we define the other party as the enemy to be destroyed. That is exactly what happened with the Iraq War in 2003 that overturned the government of Saddam Hussein. That is what happened with killing Osama Bin Laden in 2011. That is what is still happening with the war against ISIS. We are at the war with our enemies because they pose threat to our lives and even claim that they were behind the terrorism 9/11, Boston, and Paris. But the problem is that the war is not ending. Even after we take out the terrorists, they are still grown not just abroad but also home right here.

While we are struggling with the terrorism, war, and missiles, we hear the words of Paul who exhorts the Christians in Rome, “Do not overcome evil by evil, but overcome evil with good.” He even says, “Bless those who persecute you; but do not curse them.” I acknowledge that I also have a hard time accepting Paul’s words. Most of us might dismiss his exhortation as archaic as it can be. Above all, it sounds very counter-cultural today. You commit crime. You have to pay for it. I read so many people arrested for possessing illegal drugs in their vehicles from our local news all the time. You cause harm to others. You have to compensate for what you do to them. That is the logic of our society. That is how the law organizes our society. But Paul’s words reflect on another kingdom, not this world, but of God that values forgiveness and reconciliation.

Paul gives us two reasons why we need to overcome evil with good. One is theological that we are created in the image of God who ultimately forgives and loves. He says, “Beloved, never avenge yourselves, but leave room for the wrath of God; for it is written, ‘Vengeance is mine, I will repay, says the Lord.” In other words, when we judge our neighbors as our enemies and take avenge by using our power and rights, we are taking the role of God who is our ultimate judge on the final day. Of course, this does not mean that we have to negate the necessity of our government, law, and justice system. They have their roles with the civic duty to uphold what we agree as law of our society. However, as St. Augustine said in the City of God, we need to recognize that our ultimate citizenship belongs to the kingdom of God.

Paul also gives us practical reason of why we need to overcome evil with good. He says, “If your enemies are hungry, feed them; if they are thirsty, give them something to drink; for by doing this you will heap burning coals on their heads.” When someone treats us ill, the expectation is that we do the same to the person. Say the harsh words just like the person did. Strike the cheek as we are hit on our cheek. But when we repay the evil with our kindness, mercy, and friendship, we create in their hearts agony and frustration. Gandhi called non-violence as truth force. When one does not repay evil with evil, the purpose is to convert our opponent as our friend. While people see non-violent as passive tactic or sign of weakness, Gandhi saw it as the weapon of the strong that points to the truth.

When I was about 10 years old, I was sometimes bullied by this kid. He was stronger and bigger than me. So, I came up with a solution: I asked my parents to send me to Tae Kwon Do school to study the self-defense. I learned how to kick and throw punch. But the sad news was that he could still beat me because he was much stronger than me. Well, we ended up becoming friends eventually. How? I invited him to play the baseball with me at the church on Sunday morning while the adults were worshiping in the church. We often hit the ball and threw the ball in the wrong direction. Unfortunately, we broke several windows at the church and adults came out of the church looking for the suspect. The best way to eliminate your enemy is to make the person your friend. That was my lesson from my friendship with him.

As the U.S. is struggling with North Korea today, I am sure that some of us are anxious, some of us are upset, and some of us are confused. While we are still discerning what our responses should be as individual and national, Paul’s instruction might be the key to solve the conflict today. In February 2008, the New York Philharmonic went to Pyung-Yang, the capital of North Korea and performed a concert playing the national anthems of both North Korea and the United States. It is said that the event was the first significant cultural visit from the U.S. to North Korea since the Korean War. The highlight of the concert was that the orchestra ended with playing the popular Korean folk song “Arirang.” It is a song that someone is broken-hearted because his/her love is leaving her. So, one sings that his/her love shall not walk even two miles before his/her foot hurt.

I would like to invite you to watch the video with me. And see how music brings two countries, cultures, and ideologies together. Look at how the audience from North Korea is touched by the music.

As we pray for peace in this nation and world, Paul’s exhoartation sounds true as I watch this video over and over again. We do not overcome evil with evil. Rather, we overcome evil with empathy, compassion, and friendship. As Martin Luther King Jr. said, only light can drive away darkness. Let us over come evil with good by the grace of God. Amen.

 

Sermon: Draw the Circle Wide

Date- August 20, 2017

Text: Matthew 15:21-28

Title: Draw the Circle Wide

 

I need to confess that I have some story with the text from today. It was the text to preach from when I was taking the preaching course at Boston University. When you prepare a sermon or speech, there is a principle that you need to have one theme sentence. After hearing my sermon, Dr. Dale Andrews, my preaching professor, challenged me, “Man, do I hear that you are trying to say that this text is so mysterious that you don’t quite understand?” I answered, “Yes, that is correct.” “Why?” he asked again. “Well, how can Jesus call this poor woman ‘a dog’ and say such harsh words? I just don’t understand why he would do that.” He challenged me more seriously, “Why can’t you call Jesus a racist if he is one then?” I said, “I can never call Jesus a racist.” I went back to dormitory but still deeply troubled in my heart.

How about you? What do you think? Do you think that Jesus is a racist in this story? If we want to understand why Jesus is treating her harshly, we need to understand the context where Jesus and the woman come from. This conversation is happening in the district of Tyre and Sidon. Tyre and Sidon are cities located on the west coast of the current Israel. These cities were occupied by mostly Gentiles who flourished by successful trade. While many of these gentiles were growing rich with trade, they often exploited from the Jewish community in the land that depended on agriculture. So, imagine for a second that Jewish community that suffered from the political and social oppression by the Roman Empire and at the same time experiencing poverty while the Gentiles in Tyre and Sidon were experiencing abundance.

When Jesus said, “I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel,” he is pointing to his own people and community that needed some good news for that day. Jesus is arguing with the Canaanite woman that we are the ones that are suffering now. You already have enough for today. Jesus is drawing the circle of his own community. And he is pointing out the circle where she belongs. It is a mentality of us versus them, mentality of we versus the others. I believe that such mentality is what caused the tragedy of violence in Charlottesville, and triggers division politically in our society today. I would like to believe that most people in our town would not participate in such a mob bringing torches and wearing hoods. But even those who do not participate would hold such a view that it is about us versus them.

It is about whether we are republicans or democrats. It is about whether we are citizens or non-citizens. It is about whether we are born here or not born here. It is about whether we are evangelical Christians or progressive Christians. It is about whether we are whites or blacks. It is about whether we are heterosexuals or homosexuals. The list can go on and on but what holds these together is that we draw our own circles regarding who we are and it is by our human nature that we want to protect our interest, tradition, history, culture, or people intact. And we even see from our text today that Jesus is participating in belonging to his own circle. “I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.” He even goes further rejecting the request of this woman, “It is not fair to take the children’s food and throw it to the dogs.”

Ecumenical doctrine among many Christian churches affirm the belief that Jesus is the perfect God and at the same time the perfect human being. He was born into a Jewish family of Joseph and Mary. His family gathered for the celebration of Sabbath, and celebrate the Passover in remembering how God delivered God’s people from the slavery in Egypt. He and his friends went to the synagogue and were taught in the Torah and other Rabbinic tradition. He walked around his town watching poor people being beaten by the Roman soldiers because they could not pay the taxes. He saw his own women being ridiculed and made fun of by the soldiers. After all, Jesus is a Jewish young man who knew his tradition and shared the struggle of his own community. When we see our own family or community suffers, isn’t it what we are supposed to do? We protect our people. We put our people first. We fight for our people.

But you see here, the writer of Matthew tells us that this Canaanite woman is persistent. She insists Jesus grant her wish because it is not about her; it is about her daughter who is being tormented by a demon. It is possible that she tried everything. She went to see a doctor but was told that there is nothing wrong physically with her and no treatment available. She went to see a priest of her own religion but was told that there was nothing he could do. Whether you come from America, Korea, the Philippines, Russia, or any other countries, I believe that the one thing that is universal in all cultures is that we are willing to do anything for the well-being of our child or to save the life of our child. And this woman is even willing to suffer the humiliation from Jesus as long as she can hold onto the hope that her child would be healed.

And she makes an incredible statement that shows how far a devastated mother or father is willing to go. She said, “Yes, Lord, yet even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their masters’ table.” She is saying, “I may not hold the equal status as you or your people. But I still beg you to show mercy to my dying child.” “I ask you to show compassion to my suffering people.” And Jesus says, “Woman, great is your faith! Let it be done for you as you wish.” And the scripture tells us that her daughter was healed instantly. Jesus had the circles where he belonged and where she belonged. They could not be crossed over. But he crosses the circle here. He changes his mind. And this to me is the good news I believe that God is giving us today.

Or I would like to believe that he is drawing the circle wider because he does not abandon his own people, the Jewish community that suffers politically, economically, and spiritually. He continues to be their Messiah sharing the good news and performing the miracles. But because of the faith of this Canaanite woman, Jesus now even goes to the towns in the Gentile area and minister to the foreigners. It is not like Jesus is simply abandoning the circle A and move on to circle B. But he draws the circle A bigger and wider so that he can include circle B. In our society, we are experiencing many changes – our value, our family, our people, our politics, so rapidly that we feel like we are losing what we once stood for. And Jesus definitely understands that because he is a perfect human being. But he draws the circle wider to embrace those who are considered outside our family, our community, our religion and share the good news.

Some people might consider such a message as political. Oh, it is social gospel message. But it is also deeply rooted in personal holiness, our relationship with God. It is because we are once considered as the enemy of God. In Romans 5:10, Paul says, “For if, while we were God’s enemies, we were reconciled to him through the death of his Son, how much more, having been reconciled, shall we be saved through his life!” Our sins alienated us from our relationship with God making us believe that we can be happy in this world without God’s love for us. And the consequence of such alienation from God is death. God could have stayed in God’s own circle. But God comes to us by sacrificing God’s only Son, Christ, so that we might live eternally with God. And God does that for us who were once considered as the enemy of God, who is God calling us today to reach out and be reconciled with?

In our troubled time watching the hate groups of KKK and Neo-Nazis marching in the middle of the university campus in Virginia, I am drawn to a picture of Jewish mother holding and kissing her daughter one last time before they were executed by the Nazi officer. I hear the cry of the mother who is shouting, “Have mercy on me; my daughter is about to be killed.” In our troubled time with the bombings and shootings in Syria, I see the picture of many Syrian mothers who hold the dead bodies of their children crying, “How long should we suffer such evil today?” I see the CNN interview with the mother of Heather Heyer who got killed by a car plowed into a group in Charlottesville. When the anchor asked her if she had some words for the person who killed her daughter, she said, “I want to be the voice she can no longer be. But I would rather have my child back.”

Let me ask you this morning. Who are the cries of mothers that Christ calls us to listen to? Who are the cries of people that Christ calls us to draw our circles of relationship wider? In the middle of our society broken with ignorance, hatred, and stereotype, I find the good news in Christ who understands us deeply as he was also the perfect human being but give us strength to step out of our comfort zone, step out of our own community of interest and right, but meet and love people in other circles radically as God loves them in God’s grace and mercy. I pray that God empowers all of us, our community, and our world to live in such radical love today. Amen.

 

Fundraising Dinner for Youth Mission Trip 2017

Please come and support our youth group for mission trip to Philadelphia this year.

 

Date: June 3 (Saturday) 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Place: Living Faith UMC (53 Grove St. Putnam, CT 06260)

Ticket Price: $10 per Adult; $5 per Child

Menu: Lasagna, Salad, and Desert

 

*Take-Out is also available. Please email livingfaith53.umc@gmail.com or call 860-928-9705 for order in advance.

 

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